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WWII Nazi German Swamp Marsh Tan Water Pattern Camouflage Winter Uniform Tarnungs Jacke
Item #: JJ67
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Three quarter length, water repellant, cotton/rayon blend construction, double breasted style parka with the machine roller printed, softly blurred, geometric Swamp/Marsh, (Tan/Water), pattern camouflage in shades of green, tan and brown to one side. Buttons all have their original stitching. Shows minimal to no age. Roughly a 40" chest. Comes with a nice matching set of trousers. Roughly a 34" waist.
The development of camouflage clothing and equipment had began in the German army in WWI, and continued through the Weimar Reichswehr, (National Defence Force, Circa 1919-1933), era. The German army’s geometric, Splittertarnmuster 31, (Splinter camouflage pattern 31), was originally developed in late 1929 and early 1930 and was first adopted for use with the M31 quarter shelter/poncho in late 1931. Further developments in 1943 modified the original splinter pattern by softly blurring the distinct geometric pattern and slightly altering the coloration. This modified camouflage pattern was designated Sumpftarnmuster, (Swamp/Marsh camouflage pattern), although it is now commonly referred to as the Tan/Water camouflage pattern, which was once again altered in 1944 by an even stronger blurring of the distinct geometric pattern. Further camouflage pattern development continued through-out the war and additional subtly different patterns were created with the intent to equip all personnel with the same camouflage pattern but this was never achieved. After the devastating winter of 1941-1942 on the Russian front the German army found that it was drastically under equipped with cold weather garments to withstand the severe cold and a wide variety of improvised garments including a broad assortment of donated civilian garments were utilized as a temporary solution. To rectify the situation the OKH, Oberkommando des Heeres, (High Command of the Army), began testing heavier winter clothing in the spring of 1942 to develop suitable garments for the Russian front. In April 1942 Hitler approved the chosen designs and the first models were issued in the autumn of that year, in the reversible blue/mouse grey/white colorations, which was modified to camouflage pattern/white combinations in 1943. Included with these new garments were heavy, padded, reversible winter suits which consisted of a parka, pants and separate hoods and mittens. Of Note: These garments were also produced in non-reversible models. The winter parkas were a standard issue item and were distributed to all EM/NCO’s for the winter season, (September 15TH to April 15TH), with other winter garments and were to be returned to the units clothing depot in April for storage, repair and cleaning to be reissued the following September. Originally Officers and senior NCO’s responsible for purchasing their own uniforms and headgear were required to purchase the new winter garments until regulations of December 1942 extended the issue winter clothing to all ranks in the colder theatres of operation. Although the suits proved quite effective they were very difficult to keep clean and launder which resulted in regulations dictating that the white side was only to be worn on the exterior when absolutely necessary.