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WWII Nazi German Kriegsmarine Tropical Shorts Tropen Kurze Hosen
Item #: VF3953
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Light weight, ribbed, tan cotton twill construction short pants feature a vertical, four button French fly with an additional two buttons positioned on the waistband. The exterior, horizontal waistband has six, evenly spaced, vertical, belt loops. The shorts have two, diagonally angled, slash front pockets with single button closures and a small, horizontal, patch, watch pocket situated just below the right front waistband. The waistband has a small, horizontal, fabric loop positioned just above the watch pocket for securing a watch chain. The reverse of the shorts have two, horizontal, slash pockets with single button closures and two, small, vertical, tapering darts. The reverse side panels each have dual, horizontal, fit adjustment strap, with corresponding, olive drab painted, opened rectangular, dual-claw, "Prima", buckles. The buckles are secured to the straps by a folded over button down section of the straps. The bottom of the legs have dual-ply, hemmed cuffs. The interior, dual-ply, waistband has four evenly spaced suspender buttons and an additional two, vertically extended, fabric tabs with a single button to each to the reverse center. The interior waistband is well marked with black inkstamped size numerals and an RB number. Of Note: The RB numbers, Reichsbetriebnummer, (National factory code numbers), were introduced in late 1942 and were intended to replace the manufacturers marks on garments and equipment to conceal the manufactures name and location from the allies, to prevent bombing raids on German industrial factories. The interior pocket bags are constructed in khaki/tan cotton/rayon blend material with an HBT, (Herring Bone Twill), weave. The pocket bag to the left, front, exterior, pocket has an additional, small, horizontal, slash, patch pocket machine stitched to the interior. The pocket bag to the right, front, exterior, pocket is well marked with a black inkstamped mark consisting of a blurred, "B.A.W.", within a boxy "T" shaped border, indicating Bekleidungsamt Wilhelmshaven, (Clothing Depot Wilhelmshaven) and is dated 1942. The interior crotch has a machine stitched, dual-ply, oval, ribbed tan cotton reinforcement panel. The shorts are in overall excellent, unissued condition with minimal age toning. The fly, waistband and suspender buttons are all the natural, matte gray, alloy, dish type and the pocket closure buttons are the molded tan glass type and all appear to have original stitching. The shorts are roughly size 36" waist.
German Naval uniforms and headgear were based on traditional designs that date back to the creation of the Prussian Navy in 1848, and although the uniforms and headgear did evolve during the interim years, many items used during the Third Reich would still have been quite recognizable to the Imperial sailor. The German navy also had a long tradition of brown and white tropical/landing dress that was worn in hot climates with the white uniform also serving as a walking out dress. The tradition was continued through the Weimar era and in 1929 the Reichsmarine introduced new brown and white tropical/landing dress uniforms with stand-up collars. In 1937 the Kriegsmarine introduced new style brown and white tropical uniforms with lay down collars. With the impending entrance into the North African campaign in late 1940 the Kriegsmarine developed another new tropical brown uniform independently from the Heer and Luftwaffe, but retained the 1937 pattern white uniform. Included with the 1940 pattern tropical brown uniform were short pants which were issued in two basic patterns with one having an integral, tunnel looped belt while the other had fit adjustment straps and buckles. The tropical uniforms, including the short pants, were classed as Sonderbekleidungsstücke, (Special Articles of Clothing), and were only issued to personnel serving in tropical climates. Officer and certain senior NCO ranks were responsible for purchasing their own uniforms and headgear and as a result were allotted a clothing allowance through the OKK, Offizier Kleiderkasse der Kriegsmarine, (Officer’s Clothing Account of the Navy). Although enlisted personnel were issued their uniforms and headgear from government supplies they were also permitted to purchase privately tailored items although the price may have been restrictive. Generally speaking officers bought nice quality, private purchase, uniform items but they could also choose to buy their uniforms directly from the military clothing depots.
Shipping Weight: 2 lbs
Your Price $400.00 USD