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WWII US Army Complete Case of K Rations With 36 Ration Meals By Patten Food Products MINT
Item #: JJ56

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This is a once in a lifetime opportunity to own a complete case of "K" Rations that until very recently where opened for the first time since WWII. The photos speak for themselves, all rations are in MINT or near mint condition. There are 12 breakfast, 12 dinner and 12 supper meals, all complete and have never been opened. All meals were produced by Patten Food Products and all bear their label. The inner cardboard case is also present and matches the date on the outside of the wood box, July 1945.

History

In 1941, Dr. Ancel Keys (a University of Minnesota physiologist) was assigned by the U.S. War Department to design a non-perishable, ready-to-eat meal that could fit in a soldier's pocket as a short-duration, individual ration. Keys went to a local supermarket to choose foods that would be inexpensive, but still be enough to provide energy. He purchased hard biscuits, dry sausages, hard candy, and chocolate bars. He then tested his 28-ounce, 3,200 calorie (871 gram, 13,400 kJ) meals on six soldiers in a nearby army base. The meals only gained "palatable" and "better than nothing" ratings from the soldiers, but were successful in relieving hunger and providing sufficient energy. The new rations were initially intended as individual rations suitable for short durations only, to be used for a maximum of fifteen meals before supplementation or replacement with 'A-ration' or 'B-ration' field rations. They were soon called the "paratrooper ration", since paratroopers were the first to be issued the ration on an experimental basis.

The actual prototype of the K-ration was a pocket ration for paratroopers developed by the Subsistence Research Laboratory (SRL) at the request of the U.S. Army Air Forces (USAAF) early in the war. Two original samples (one version used pemmican biscuits, a peanut bar, raisins, and bouillon paste; the other used pemmican biscuits, a small D ration bar, canned processed meat, and lemon beverage powder) evolved into the one-package breakfast-dinner-supper combination later adopted as standard. The Quartermaster Command's Subsistence Branch altered some components and renamed the ration the Field Ration, Type K, or "K-ration"; the final version totaled 2,830 calories a day. The first procurement of K-rations was made in May 1942. Some believed the K-ration was named after Dr. Keys or was short for "Kommando" (as elite troops were the first to receive it). However, the letter "K" was selected because it was phonetically distinct from other letter-name rations.

The K-ration first saw use in 1942, when it was issued to U.S. Airborne troops on an experimental basis. Initial reports praised it for the variety of the foods incorporated, as well as the light weight. However, testing in extreme climatic and operating environments was extremely limited: in jungle testing, for example, the K-ration was evaluated in Panama by paratroopers and the Panama Jungle Test Platoon in an experiment lasting only three days. Marching was done not through jungle, as might be expected, but only on flat or gently rolling terrain on cleared roads, for an average of only eleven miles per day. The test platoons carried one K-ration, weapon, poncho, shelter half, and a single filled one-quart canteen. No testing was done of men on extended patrols or with heavier individual loads of ammunition and water.At the end of the three days, the men were weighed, and as no abnormal weight loss were noted, the K-ration was deemed successful. These findings were later used in 1943 to support a decision to discontinue production of the Mountain ration and the Jungle ration. Both of these specialized rations had proved costlier to produce in their original form, and were intensely disliked by the Army's Subsistence Branch staff of the Quartermaster Corps, who had to secure additional supply contracts and storage facilities for the new rations. Though the K-ration was designed to be an emergency ration, Quartermaster Corps officials would continue to insist until the end of the war that the K-ration would satisfy all requirements for a lightweight complete field ration for all front-line troops at a scale of one K-ration per man per day, using the prior experiments with airborne forces as evidence. The ration's intended use as a short-term assault ration would soon fall by the wayside once U.S. forces entered combat.

One major criticism of the K-ration was its caloric and vitamin content, judged as inadequate based on evaluations made during and after World War II of the ration's actual use by Army forces. There was also a danger of over-reliance, which could cause the three meals to become monotonous if issued for long periods of time. Fundamental to the K-ration's inadequacy was its ration allowance, rigorously standardized at one ration per man per day. Because of the short duration and hasty nature of experimental testing of the K-ration before adoption, ration planners did not realize that soldiers fighting, digging, and marching in extreme conditions would require many more calories per day than a soldier marching over cleared roads in temperate climates. Nevertheless, one K-ration per man per day would remain the basis of issue, even for mountain troops fighting at high altitudes and infantrymen fighting in the thick jungles of Burma.

Evaluation and field reports

The C-ratio was the only ration comparable to the K-ration in widespread issue, with six cans comprising one full ration. Introduced in 1938 (and refined in 1940, 1943/1944 and 1945), it was significantly heavier, with less variety in meals, but more calories.

While fighting in the European Theater of Operations, the US Army discovered that troops also quickly got tired of the K-ration, some being forced to eat it for days, or rarely, in excess of a week on end. As it was based on an emergency ration, the K-ration provided roughly 800–1,200 calories fewer than required by highly active men, especially those working in extreme heat or bitter cold, and malnutrition became evident. The problem was exacerbated by insistence on a rigorous issue of a single K-ration per day rather than supplying additional K-rations for active men. The packaging of the K-ration into separately described daily meals may have intensified this problem by leading commanders to assume that daily caloric intake was sufficient. An extensive 1943 field report from the European theater noted that none of the packaged rations were recommended for continued use by active troops for periods in excess of 10 days. A survey of troops in the forward areas and evacuation hospitals of the Fifth U.S. Army serving in the Italian campaign noted that almost all soldiers questioned in infantry, engineer, and other mobile forward units said they had lost weight since the beginning of the Italian campaign. Surgeons commented upon a noticeable decrease in body fat and wasting of muscle, requiring copious feeding and rest, as well as ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) deficiency.

The K-ration was also criticized for its performance in the China-Burma-India (CBI) theater of operations, where difficulties in supply from bases in India had resulted in widespread and monotonous use of the K-ration for light infantry forces of the United States, as well as Nationalist China and the United Kingdom. Many soldiers, including the U.S. unit known as Merrill's Marauders and British Chindit forces in Burma had for five months lived primarily on K-rations, supplemented by rice, tea, sugar, jam, bread, and canned meat rations, which were dropped to them by air. In the case of the Marauders, whose diet consisted of 80% K-rations, severe weight loss (an average of 35 pounds per man) and vitamin deficiency were noted, which may have also contributed to a decline in resistance to various tropical diseases. A British medical officer reported that, of 209 Chindits examined at the end of this time, 182 had lost up to 30 pounds and 27 had lost from 30 to 70 pounds. Deficiency diseases such as pellagra and beriberi were diagnosed. One of British General Orde Wingate’s units in the Dehra Dun area was visited by quartermaster logistics officers some months after they had last eaten K-rations. At the sight of a box of K-rations carried by the visitors, two of Wingate’s men vomited.

The unpalatable nature of some of the K-ration's components, such as the fatty pork loaf or the highly acidic lemon powder, caused many users to throw them away, further reducing actual consumed calorific content. Often, a secondary food source was issued, such as a D-ration bar, or fresh oranges, in an attempt to bring up the calorie and vitamin content.

In 1943, a ration board headed by the chief of the Nutrition Branch, Office of the Chief Surgeon, was appointed and directed to conduct comprehensive field tests on rations which would be used later in combat. In the first of these field tests it was noted that troops remained in reasonably good physical condition during a 10-day period on C, K, and five-in-one rations but that the rations were deficient in calories, especially for large men. The report listed the following recommendations: The use of the D ration as a supplement only; the further restriction of the use of C and K-rations to five-day periods unless supplemented; and the replacement of the wholly unsatisfactory dextrose and malted tablets of the K-ration with a more acceptable substitute. Additionally, replacement of the fruit powder component of C- and K-rations with a source of ascorbic acid that would guarantee the utilization of this nutrient was recommended, as the current diet of troops operating on individual rations in the field was almost wholly devoid of ascorbic acid.

By war's end, millions of K-rations had been produced, but the army had lost interest in them. Postwar Army supply plans for field rations relied solely on heavier canned wet rations, initially the C-ration, later by similar canned rations such as the MCI, primarily to save additional cost of procurement and storage. In 1948, after introduction of improvements in the C ration, the K-ration was declared obsolete; production contracts had long since terminated. Most existing K-ration stocks were declared surplus, and distributed to civilian feeding programs overseas.

Packaging

The K-ration originally came packed in an unbleached tan-colored rectangular cardstock box with black lettering. The outer box was printed on its top in bold capital sans serif block letter type with the text: "US ARMY FIELD RATION K", with the meal unit type (BREAKFAST, DINNER, or SUPPER UNIT) printed underneath it and a capital letter on each end (B, D, or S). While it was intended that the three meals be eaten in their named order, they were not always consumed in this manner. The inner box had the meal unit type printed across its top and a capital letter on each end (B, D, or S).

The later "Morale Series" had unique packaging designs that were color-coded and letter-coded on the ends for quick identification. The breakfast ration box had brown printing and was marked with a brown capital letter "B" on the ends, the dinner ration box had blue printing and was marked with a blue capital letter "D" on the ends, and the supper ration box had olive drab printing and was marked with an olive drab capital "S" on the ends. The packaging commencing with the earliest version of the ration consisted of a chemically-treated cardboard outer carton and a waterproofed waxed-cardboard inner carton to protect the contents from contamination or damage. The waxed carton was found useful by soldiers to start small fires in which to boil water for coffee or cocoa.

The entrée came in a small, round metal can painted green with black lettering, with a metal key (dubbed a "twist key") to open it, packaged in a roughly square 3 × 234 × 1716 inch (7.5 × 7 × 3.7 cm) cardboard box.

The rest of the meal came packed neatly in a waxed paper or laminated cellophane pack. The pack always contained two packages of 8 rectangular K-1 or 4 square K-2 calorie-dense cracker biscuits each, a 4-pack of commercial-grade cigarettes, and either a flat rectangular stick of chewing gum or a square piece of candy-coated gum. Special items (like matches or Halazone tablets) were packed in one unit but not the others due to space limitations. Late production meals added a paper-wrapped paddle-like disposable wooden spoon and used the standard P-38 can opener instead of the "twist key".

Menu

  • Breakfast Unit: canned entree veal (early version), canned chopped ham and eggs (all subsequent versions), biscuits, dextrose or malted milk tablets (early version), dried fruit bar, pre-mixed oatmeal cereal (late version) Halazone water purification tablets, a four-pack of cigarettes, Dentyne or Wrigley chewing gum, instant coffee, a packet of toilet paper tissues, and sugar (granulated, cubed, or compressed).
  • Dinner Unit: canned entree pork luncheon meat (early version), canned processed American cheese, Swiss and American cheese, or bacon and cheese, (cheese entree all subsequent versions) biscuits, 15 Dextrose or malted milk (diastatic malt) tablets (early) or five caramels (late), sugar (granulated, cubed, or compressed), salt packet, a four-pack of cigarettes and a box of matches, chewing gum, and a powdered beverage packet (lemon (c.1940), orange (c. 1943), or grape (c. 1945) flavor).
  • Supper Unit: canned meat, consisting of cervelat sausage, (early version), either pork luncheon meat with carrot or apple (first issue), beef and pork loaf (second issue); biscuits; a 2-ounce (57 g) D ration emergency chocolate bar, (early version) Tropical bar, or (in temperate climates) commercial sweet chocolate bar (late version), a packet of toilet paper tissues; a four-pack of cigarettes; chewing gum, and a bouillon packet (cube or powder).

In total, the three meals provided between 2,830 and 3,000 calories, depending upon components. As it was originally intended as an "assault" ration to be issued for short durations, the K-ration was designed to be used for a maximum of 15 meals. The K-ration was mass-produced by several major U.S. food production companies, including H. J. Heinz, Patten Food Products Company and The Cracker Jack Company.

K-ration crates were either wood (43 lbs./20 kg each) or fiberboard (41 lbs./18.5 kg each) and had a volume of 1.4 cubic feet. Each crate contained 12 daily rations (each daily ration consisting of one Breakfast unit, one Dinner unit, and one Supper unit) for a total of 36 units per crate. They were packed one unit deep, three units wide (one of each unit), and twelve units long (all of the same unit type).

The U.S. Army M-1943 herringbone twill (HBT) fatigue uniform had simplified, but large, pockets that were designed to be able to hold a K-Ration box.

Shipping Weight: 48 lbs
Your Price $9,900.00 USD

WWII US Army Air Corps Flight Surgeon 3 Inch Wings By Pasquale
Item #: VF4261

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US Army Air Corps Flight Surgeon wings measure 3 inches and are maker marked Pasquale STERLING. This beautiful set of wings have never been cleaned and are very attractive.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $360.00 USD

WWII Nazi German Wehrmacht Jäger EM/NCO'S Tropical Overseas Cap Tropenfeldmütze
Item #: FRJ132

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Ribbed, olive/khaki, cotton twill construction cap with fold down side and back panels with gently sloping, downward scallops to the front and the forward sides. As is typical the fold down panels are handstitched in the upright position at the front center of the cap. The cap has a tan painted, metal alloy ventilation grommet to both sides situated just below the crown edge. The cap grommets retain all of their original tan paint. The top center seam is correctly stitched right through the interior liner, for added strength. The front center of the cap has a machine woven, national eagle with outstretched wings, clutching a wreathed, canted swastika in its talons, in light blue/grey cotton threads, on a cut-out, woven, tan rayon base. The front center of the fold down panels has a machine woven, national tri-color cockade in black, white and red cotton threads, on a woven, tan, diamond shaped, rayon base. Both the eagle and the cockade are original stitching to the cap. The tri-color cockade is flanked by an inverted "V", vibrant, light green rayon branch of service soutache. The soutache has been applied in the correct manner, being machine stitched in place and inserted through two small puncture holes near the bottom edge of the cap. Red cotton interior with Clemens Wagner maker stamped. 57 size stamp and 1942 dated.  Excellent untouched cap.
In late 1940, with the impending German entrance into the North African campaign, tropical uniforms, headgear and equipment were quickly developed and issued in time for DAK, Deutsches Afrika Korps, (German Africa Corps), personnel’s arrival in Tripoli in February 1941. One of the new headgear items introduced was the tropical overseas cap that followed the basic design of the earlier, modified, M34 overseas caps. On their introduction these caps were originally designated, "Mütze, oliv, für Panzerschützen", (Cap, Olive, for Armored Soldiers), and apparently were intended for wear by armored personnel although they were issued to all branches of service. Officer’s ranks tropical overseas caps were distinguished from EM/NCO’s with silver piping for the ranks of Leutnant to Oberst and gilt piping for the ranks of Generalmajor to Generalfeldmarschall while EM/NCO’s ranks caps were not piped. The insignia utilized on the tropical overseas cap consisted of the standard black, white and red national tri-color cockade on a tan colored base and a national eagle in light blue/grey threads on tan base. The different branches of service within the army were allocated a specific, identifying waffenfarbe, (Branch of Service Color), with light green being chosen for Jäger, (Light Infantry), personnel. Originally the tropical overseas caps had a branch of service soutache applied to the front consisting of an inverted "V" flanking the national tri-color cockade but regulations of July 10TH 1942 abolished the use of the soutache and instructed it to be removed from the caps, although the directive was not strictly adhered to. Of Note: Due to the overlapping use of various shades of green waffenfarbe by Jägers, (Light Infantry), Schützen, (Rifles), Gebirgsjäger, (Mountain troops), and Panzer Grenadiers, (Armored Infantry), it is difficult to attribute the branch of service with absolute certainty.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $600.00 USD

WWII Nazi German Wehrmacht EM/NCO'S Tropical Overseas Cap Tropenfeldmütze
Item #: FRJ131

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Ribbed olive/khaki, cotton twill construction cap with fold down side and back panels with gently sloping, downward scallops to the front and the forward sides. As is typical the fold down panels are handstitched in the upright position at the front center of the cap. The cap has a tan painted, in metal alloy ventilation grommet to both sides situated just below the crown edge. The top center seam is correctly stitched right through the interior liner, for added strength. The front center of the cap has a machine woven national eagle in light blue/grey threads on a cut-out, woven tan rayon base. The eagle is neatly machine stitched to the cap. The front center of the fold down panel has a machine woven national tri-color cockade, on a woven, tan rayon, diamond shaped base which is also machine stitched in place. The interior of the cap is fully lined in light weight red cotton. The lining is well marked with a black size ink stamp of 54 size and 43 date. Is also RB Nr. stamped . Nice untouched all original example.
In late 1940, with the impending German entrance into the North African campaign, tropical uniforms, headgear and equipment were quickly developed and issued in time for DAK, Deutsches Afrika Korps, (German Africa Corps), personnel’s arrival in Tripoli in February 1941. One of the new headgear items introduced was the tropical overseas cap that followed the basic design of the earlier, modified, M34 overseas caps. On their introduction these caps were originally designated, "Mütze, oliv, für Panzerschützen", (Cap, Olive, for Armored Soldiers), and apparently were intended for wear by armored personnel although they were issued to all branches of service. Originally the tropical overseas caps had a branch of service soutache applied to the front consisting of an inverted "V" flanking the national tri-color cockade but regulations of July 10TH 1942 abolished the use of the soutache and instructed it to be removed from the caps, although the directive was not strictly adhered to.
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WWII German Nazi Wehrmacht Cavalry Unterfeldwebel's Shoulder Straps Schulterklappen
Item #: FRJ130

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Third and final pattern, (Circa September 1944-May 1945), slip on shoulder straps in green tinted, field-Gray wool/rayon blend material with yellow rayon waffenfarbe and NCO’s tress to all outside edges. Both of the slip on retaining tongues are field-gray 44 wool/rayon material and both the bottoms of the straps and the tongues have a central, gray rayon reinforcement strip, machine stitched in place. 
On November 26TH 1938 the first pattern, pointed tip, shoulder straps without waffenfarben, (Branch of Service Color), utilized by EM/NCO’s were replaced with a rounded tip shoulder strap that included the branch of service waffenfarben. Originally these second pattern straps were manufactured in blue/green badge cloth until regulations in May 1940 altered their construction to field-gray wool. These second pattern shoulder straps were worn for the duration of the war although a third and final pattern was introduced in September 1944. The third pattern shoulder straps remained basically the same as the second pattern shoulder straps but were of generally poorer construction using the newly introduced gray/brown fabric that was designated, field-gray 44 and the waffenfarben was visible on the bottoms.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $250.00 USD

WWII Nazi German Wehrmacht Officer's Vehicle Pennant Eagle
Item #: FRJ129

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Wehrmacht blue/gray cotton construction pennant features a nicely detailed, machine embroidered, Wehrmacht eagle in silvery/white threads with blue/gray accent threads, to the center of each side.
Personal and unit command pennants were an old German Army tradition which was continued and expanded during the Third Reich and included new designs and patterns for the fledgling Luftwaffe. Regulations concerning Luftwaffe personal and unit command pennants can be found dated as early as January 1935, before the formation of the Luftwaffe was officially announced. The personal and unit command pennants underwent numerous minor alterations at various times through-out the war. The Officer’s vehicle pennant was introduced on December 27TH 1935 and was originally designated, Dienstwimpel, (Service Pennant), on April 27TH 1937 the designation was altered to Luftwaffenwimpel, (Air Force Pennant). This pattern pennant was utilized by Officer’s who were not authorized a command or staff pennant. The pennant was flown from the left, front, fender of the Officer’s official or personal vehicle, when the Officer was uniformed and in the vehicle. Of Note: Regulations also dictated that the vehicle flying the pennant be of German manufacture and in good condition. Further regulations of June 17TH 1938 permitted all Luftwaffe personnel, regardless of rank, to fly the vehicle pennant on privately owned cars as long as it was being driven by uniformed personnel. The pennants usually came with a removable protective covering.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $125.00 USD

WWII Nazi German Luftwaffe Officer's Vehicle Pennant Eagle
Item #: FRJ128

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Luftwaffe blue/gray cotton construction pennant features a nicely detailed, machine embroidered, second pattern Luftwaffe eagle in silvery/white threads with blue/gray accent threads, to the center of each side. The eagles wingspan is roughly, 18cm from tip to tip.
Personal and unit command pennants were an old German Army tradition which was continued and expanded during the Third Reich and included new designs and patterns for the fledgling Luftwaffe. Regulations concerning Luftwaffe personal and unit command pennants can be found dated as early as January 1935, before the formation of the Luftwaffe was officially announced. The personal and unit command pennants underwent numerous minor alterations at various times through-out the war. The Officer’s vehicle pennant was introduced on December 27TH 1935 and was originally designated, Dienstwimpel, (Service Pennant), on April 27TH 1937 the designation was altered to Luftwaffenwimpel, (Air Force Pennant). This pattern pennant was utilized by Officer’s who were not authorized a command or staff pennant. The pennant was flown from the left, front, fender of the Officer’s official or personal vehicle, when the Officer was uniformed and in the vehicle. Of Note: Regulations also dictated that the vehicle flying the pennant be of German manufacture and in good condition. Further regulations of June 17TH 1938 permitted all Luftwaffe personnel, regardless of rank, to fly the vehicle pennant on privately owned cars as long as it was being driven by uniformed personnel. The pennants usually came with a removable protective covering.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $125.00 USD

WWII Nazi Hitler Youth Membership Pin RZM Coded 1/105 Hermann Aurich of Dresden.
Item #: FRJ127

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Roughly 1 1/8 tall, 14mm 5/8 wide, die struck alloy, diamond shaped badge with red, white and black enamel work. The vertical diamond badge features translucent red enamel with an underlying pebbled field to the top and bottom quarters and solid white enamel to the side quarters. The center of the badge has a diamond with a central canted black enamel swastika. Reverse is maker marked to "RZM 1/105" which indicates Hermann Aurich of Dresden.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $60.00 USD

WWII Nazi German Hitler Youth BDM Ost Pommern District Sleeve Triangle Obergauarmdreieck
Item #: FRJ126

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Black rayon construction isosceles triangle with a machine woven Gothic script in two lines, "Ost Pommern" in gray to its interior. The triangle is in overall excellent, unissued condition. Very clean, untouched example. Nice.
The BDM, Bund Deutscher Mädel, (League of German Girls), was the female counterpart of the male Hitler Jugend, (Hitler Youth), for girls aged 15-17, and was originally established in December 1928 as the Schwesternschaft der HJ, (Sisterhood of the HJ). In July 1930 the organization was re-designated Bund Deutscher Mädel and in April 1931 the JM, Jungmädelgruppe, (Young Girls Group), for girls aged 10-14, was established as the counterpart of the male Deutsche Jugend, (German Youth), On June 1ST 1932 the BDM/JM gained official status as an independent organization of the NSDAP. On January 1ST 1933 the HJ introduced a district sleeve triangle which identified the wearers unit location in the organizational control of the HJ, with the Obergebiet, (Higher Organizational Control), followed by the Gebiet, (Lower Organizational Control), until a restructuring in November 1936 replaced the Obergebiet level with the Obergau level. In April 1934 wear of the district sleeve triangles was extended to include BDM/JM personnel. The HJ district sleeve triangles featured golden yellow script while the BDM/JM district sleeve triangles utilized silver script.
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WWII Nazi German Hitler Youth BDM "SÜDOST KARNTEN" District Sleeve Triangle Obergauarmdreieck
Item #: VF4260

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Black rayon construction isosceles triangle with a machine woven Gothic script in two lines, "Südost Kärnten" in gray to its interior. The triangle is in overall excellent, unissued condition. Very clean, untouched example. Nice.
The BDM, Bund Deutscher Mädel, (League of German Girls), was the female counterpart of the male Hitler Jugend, (Hitler Youth), for girls aged 15-17, and was originally established in December 1928 as the Schwesternschaft der HJ, (Sisterhood of the HJ). In July 1930 the organization was re-designated Bund Deutscher Mädel and in April 1931 the JM, Jungmädelgruppe, (Young Girls Group), for girls aged 10-14, was established as the counterpart of the male Deutsche Jugend, (German Youth), On June 1ST 1932 the BDM/JM gained official status as an independent organization of the NSDAP. On January 1ST 1933 the HJ introduced a district sleeve triangle which identified the wearers unit location in the organizational control of the HJ, with the Obergebiet, (Higher Organizational Control), followed by the Gebiet, (Lower Organizational Control), until a restructuring in November 1936 replaced the Obergebiet level with the Obergau level. In April 1934 wear of the district sleeve triangles was extended to include BDM/JM personnel. The HJ district sleeve triangles featured golden yellow script while the BDM/JM district sleeve triangles utilized silver script.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $90.00 USD

WWII Nazi German Recruiting SS Sturmbannführer's Shoulder Boards Schulterstücke)
Item #: FRJ125

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Slip on shoulder boards in interwoven matte, silver/aluminum Russian braid with orange rayon waffenfarbe mounted on a black wool bases. The shoulder boards have a narrow, black wool, slip on retaining tongues both intact.
Originally shoulder straps for Allgemeine-SS, (General-SS), EM/NCO’s personnel were introduced on May 26TH 1933 at the same time as the SA, Sturm Abteilung, (Storm Troops), shoulder straps were introduced. These first pattern shoulder straps were also worn by SS-VT, SS-Verfügungstruppe, (SS-Special Purpose Troops), and, SS-TV, SS-Totenkopfverbände units, (SS-Deaths Head units), which were to become the nucleus of the Waffen-SS, (Armed-SS). On their introduction the shoulder straps for both SS and SA personnel were identical. In July 1935 the first army style shoulder straps for EM/NCO’s were introduced to distinguish the armed SS-VT and SS-TK personnel from the political Allgemeine-SS personnel. Army style shoulder boards for Officer’s were introduced in early 1938 and in November 1939 the Waffen-SS adopted waffenfarben, (Branch of Service Colors), with each branch of service being allocated a specific, identifying, color, with pink being chosen for Panzer, (Armored), personnel which was displayed as piping on the shoulder boards. The transition to the army style shoulder boards was pretty much complete in 1939 and these army style shoulder boards would be worn by all Waffen-SS officers ranks. Of Note: Company and Field grade officers ranks originally utilized bright silver/aluminum Russian braiding on their shoulder boards until regulations of December 1939 discontinued the bright braiding for a more subdued, less visible matte braiding for camouflage purposes although the change over was never complete accomplished. Also Of Note: The RZM, Reichzeugmeisterei, (National Equipment Quartermaster), was official founded in June 1934 in Munich by the NSDAP as a Reich Hauptamt, (State Central Office), and was based on the earlier SA Quartermaster’s Department. The functions of the RZM were not only to procure and distribute items to Party formations, but also to approve chosen designs and to act as a quality control supervisor to ensure items manufactured for the Party met required specification and were standardized. Starting in late 1934 items manufactured for the SS came under the quality control of the RZM and were marked by a cloth RZM/SS approval tag. The dimensions and design of these cloth tags was altered in 1935 and this second pattern tag remained in use until early 1938, when it was replaced by a paper tag. Of Note: In 1943 the Waffen-SS assumed full control over their uniform item production and no longer fell under the authority of the RZM.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $450.00 USD

WWII Nazi German Panzer Wehrmacht Unteroffizier's Shoulder Straps With 2nd Panzer Slides
Item #: FRJ124

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Later, second pattern, (circa May 1940-1945), field-gray wool construction, slip on shoulder straps with subdued blue/gray rayon, diamond patterned, NCO’s tress to all but the sew on ends. Complete, excellent condition and pink rayon waffenfarbe. Both straps also retain their wool construction shoulder strap slides with chain stitched regimental numerals, "2" in pink cotton threads to obverse.
On November 26TH 1938 the first pattern, pointed tip, shoulder straps without waffenfarben utilized by EM/NCO’s were replaced with a rounded tip shoulder strap that included the branch of service waffenfarben. Originally these second pattern straps were manufactured in blue/green badge cloth until regulations in May 1940 altered their construction to field-grey wool. These second pattern shoulder straps were worn for the duration of the war although a third and final pattern was introduced in September 1944.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $375.00 USD

WWII Nazi German Panzer Wehrmacht Unterfeldwebel's Shoulder Straps With 100th Slides
Item #: FRJ123

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Black wool construction, slip on shoulder straps with subdued, diamond patterned, NCO’s tress to all sides and pink rayon waffenfarbe. Both straps also retain their wool construction shoulder strap slides with chain stitched regimental numerals, "100" in pink cotton threads to obverse. The black wool base and pink numerals indicate straps were issued to Panzer personnel serving with the 100th Panzer Regiment, a component of the second 21st Panzer Division. Original formed from components of the 5th Leichte Division, the first 21st Panzer Division served in north Africa until it was virtually destroyed in May 1943 in Tunisia. In July 1943 remnants of the division were reformed into the second 21st Panzer Division in Normandy with the 100th Panzer Regiment. This second 21st Panzer Division was equipped with French tanks and fought in Normandy against the allied invasion until August 1944 when it returned to Germany for refitting. The Division returned to the western front until late 1944 when it was transferred to the eastern front where it was destroyed by the Russians in April 1945.
On November 26TH 1938 the first pattern, pointed tip, shoulder straps without waffenfarben utilized by EM/NCO’s were replaced with a rounded tip shoulder strap that included the branch of service waffenfarben. Originally these second pattern straps were manufactured in blue/green badge cloth until regulations in May 1940 altered their construction to field-grey wool. These second pattern shoulder straps were worn for the duration of the war although a third and final pattern was introduced in September 1944.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $400.00 USD

WWII Kupal Nazi German Allgemeine SS Visor Hat Skull Marked M1/24 Overhoff & Cie
Item #: FRJ122

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Die stamped, obverse of skull has a beautifully toned silvered finish, with both prongs intact measuring 30x30 mm, marked RZM "M1/24", indicating manufacture by Overhoff & Cie of Lüdenscheid
On July 20TH 1934 shortly after the, June 30TH 1934, purge of the SA, Sturm Abteilung, (Storm/Assault Detachment), on the "Night of the Long Knives", the SS, Schutz Staffel, (Protection Squad) was rewarded by Hitler by being granted the status of an independent organization under direct control of the NSDAP Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei, (National Socialist German Worker’s Party). Originally, (circa 1932), SS personnel had worn the Imperial Prussian Danziger style skull and the political style national eagle on their visor caps. In an attempt to distance themselves from the SA, the SS introduced a new pattern cap skull to replace the previously used Imperial Prussian Danziger style skull on October 6TH 1934 and in February 1936 a new SS pattern national cap eagle was introduced. Both these pieces of insignia were worn through-out the war. The RZM, Reichzeugmeisterei, (National Equipment Quartermaster), was officially founded in June 1934 in Munich by the NSDAP as a Reich Hauptamt, (State Central Office), and was based on the earlier SA Quartermaster’s Department. The functions of the RZM were not only to procure and distribute items to Party formations, but also to approve chosen designs and to act as a quality control supervisor to ensure items manufactured for the Party met required specification and were standardized. Starting in late 1934 items manufactured for the SS came under the quality control of the RZM and were marked with a RZM/SS approval/acceptance mark. In 1943 the Waffen-SS assumed full control over their uniform item production and no longer fell under the authority of the RZM.
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