Search Our Catalog

Newly Added Items

WWII US Marine Corps VMF-113 Whistling Devils Squadron Patch
Item #: VF4759

Click image to enlarge
This is a rare World War II United States Marine Corps jacket patch for VMF-113 (Fighter Squadron 113), also known as the "Whistling Devils”. During World War II the squadron fought at the Marshall Islands and also served at Okinawa as part of the 4th Base Defense Air Wing. The Disney-designed patch shows Death outfitted with boxing gloves flying an F4U Corsair. This insignia has been removed from the jacket. 
World War II
VMF-113 was activated on January 1, 1943 at Marine Corps Air Station El Toro as part of Marine Base Defense Air Group 41. They were shortly given their full complement of 24 F4U Corsairs. After training for most of 1943, the squadron set sail from San Diego on September 28, 1943 headed for Hawaii. Upon their arrival the aircraft were sent to Marine Corps Air Station Ewa for their final round of training. In January 1944, the squadron learned they would be participating in the reduction of the remaining Japanese garrisons in the Marshall Islands. They soon set sail for Tarawa in the Gilbert Islands and then quickly moved to Kwajalein and finally began operating from Engebi on February 27, 1944 as part of the 4th Base Defense Air Wing. While there they were also responsible for attacking Japanese positions in the western Caroline Islands. On March 26, 1944, while escorting 4 B-25 bombers on a raid over Ponape, the squadron recorded their first enemy kills when they down 8 Japanese aircraft. In April of that year they were tasked with providing air support for the landings at Ujeland. Since the assault was unopposed the squadron quickly returned to striking Japanese targets in the Marshall Islands for the remainder of 1944. On May 6, 1945, VMF-113 landed on Ie Shima as part of Marine Aircraft Group 22 (MAG-22) to support operations during the Battle of Okinawa. The next day the squadron saw its first action since early 1944 when a mass kamikaze raid came after the US fleet assembled for the invasion of the island. The squadron moved to Okinawa in July 1945 and remained there for the remainder of the war. The squadron accounted for 20 enemy aircraft shot down during the course of their involvement in World War II. After the war, the squadron was moved to Omura on the southern Japanese Island of Kyūshū on September 20, 1945 and stayed there until late November when they sailed for the United States. They arrived in San Diego on December 5 and were soon based out of MCAS El Toro. The squadron was deactivated on April 30, 1947.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $500.00 USD

WWII Nazi German WAFFEN SS Armband Ärmelbinde
Item #: VF4758

Click image to enlarge
Bright golden yellow cotton/rayon construction armband with black printed, Latin script with SS runes, "Waffen-SS" to the obverse. Both the top and bottom edges of the armband have dual-ply, machine stitched hems and the reverse of the armband has a machine stitched, central, vertical, seam. The armband is in overall very good condition with minimal age and usage toning.
With the German invasion of the Soviet Union on June 22ND 1941 the German army and the Waffen-SS encountered large segments of the non-ethnic Russian populace that greeted them as liberators from the yoke of Bolshevism. Although Hitler was suspicious of the ethnic make-up and loyalty of these personnel the German commanders in the field quickly saw the advantage of utilizing these willing personnel in non-combatant roles. As a result of manpower restrictions the German army and the Waffen-SS began employing non-ethnic Russian POW’s and volunteers as laborers, drivers, supply personnel etc., in the rear areas as early as the summer of 1941 against the express wishes of Hitler. When incorporated into service with the Waffen-SS these non-uniformed civilian auxiliary personnel were issued an identifying armband to be worn on the upper left sleeve.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $325.00 USD

WWII Nazi Deutsche Reichspost Armband Kampfbinde
Item #: VF4757

Click image to enlarge
German postal worker's armband is entirely of machine woven construction, black thread on a green cotton blended backing, BeVo embroidered. The seamed reverse includes the woven name and location of the manufacturer, Wuppertal.
As with most nations, the German national postal service was a uniformed organization, whose uniform regulations were altered shortly after the NSDAP achieved political power in January of 1933.

Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $300.00 USD

WWII Nazi German Waffen SS EM/NCO'S Belt Buckle 155/40 Koppelschloß
Item #: VF4756

Click image to enlarge
Stamped steel construction, standard pattern, box buckle. The obverse of the buckle features a smooth outer field with a high relief, embossed central motif consisting of an SS style national eagle with out-stretched wings, clutching a wreath encompassing a static swastika. The swastika and wreath are in turn encompassed by a circular simulated twisted rope border with Gothic script motto, "Meine Ehre heißt Treue!", (My Honour is Loyalty!). The script is situated on a subtly textured background field and is encircled by the inner and an outer simulated twisted rope borders. The reverse of the buckle is a mirror image of the obverse and has the brazed buckle catch, prong bar and prongs all intact. The reverse of the buckle is well marked with an, impressed RZM logo and SS runes flanking the manufacturers contract code number and date "155/40"  indicating manufacture by F. W. Assmann & Söhne of Lüdenscheid in 1940.
The Allgemeine-SS, (General-SS), was originally formed in May 1923 under the auspices of the SA, Sturm Abteilung, (Storm/Assault Detachment), as the Stosstrupp Adolf Hitler (Shock Troops), and was redesignated Schutz Staffel, (Protection Squad), in April 1925 with the official acceptance of the name verified on the second anniversary of the failed Munich "Beer-Hall" Putsch on November 9TH 1925. As a subordinate unit to the SA, early SS personnel wore the standard SA style box belt buckle. It is believed that Adolf Hitler personally designed a new pattern box belt buckle specifically for wear by SS EM/NCO personnel with the manufacturing patent being originally granted to the Overhoff & Cie. firm in Lüdenscheid. This new style buckle was adopted for wear by EM/NCO personnel in late 1931 or early 1932. Generally the early buckles were produced in solid nickel/silver until sometime in 1936 when aluminum alloys replaced the nickel/silver versions. In 1940 the EM/NCO’s belt buckles began to be manufactured in steel replacing the aluminum alloy buckles. Of Note: The RZM, Reichzeugmeisterei, (National Equipment Quartermaster), was officially founded in June 1934 in Munich by the NSDAP, Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei, (National Socialist German Worker’s Party), as a Reich Hauptamt, (State Central Office), and was based on the earlier SA Quartermaster’s Department. The functions of the RZM were not only to procure and distribute items to Party formations, but also to approve chosen designs and to act as a quality control supervisor to ensure items manufactured for the Party met required specification and were standardized. Starting in late 1934 items manufactured for the SS came under the quality control of the RZM and as a result were to be marked with the RZM/SS approval/acceptance mark. In 1943 the Waffen-SS assumed full control over their uniform item production and no longer fell under the authority of the RZM.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $500.00 USD

Additional Pages
[Previous Page]  1  2