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WWII Nazi German Luftwaffe Transitional M16 Double Decal Helmet With Original Chinstrap & Liner
Item #: VF4654

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The sheet steel construction helmet retains about 90% of its original smooth, Luftwaffe blue/gray paint. The left side of the helmet has a first pattern, "droop-tailed", (circa 1934-1936/1937), Luftwaffe eagle which is retained about 85% and has age toned to a gilt coloration. The right side of the helmet has a national tri-color shield decal which is retained about 95%. All three, early liner retaining rivets and both inset ventilation bushings are all intact. The interior of the helmet has a light, tan leather liner. All the liner fingers and the original tie string are complete. The interior left side apron has the stamped manufacturers code and size, "BF62", indicating manufacture by, Emaillierwerk, AG Fulda, size 64. The helmet comes complete with a blackened leather chinstrap with a painted blue/gray fittings. Nice, early Luftwaffe helmet.
The first "modern" steel helmets were introduced by the French army in early 1915 and were shortly followed by the British army later that year. With plans on the drawing board, experimental helmets in the field, ("Gaede" helmet), and some captured French and British helmets the German army began tests for their own steel helmet at the Kummersdorf Proving Grounds in November, and in the field in December 1915. An acceptable pattern was developed and approved and production began at Eisen-und Hüttenwerke, AG Thale/Harz, in the spring of 1916. These first modern M16 helmets evolved into the M18 helmets by the end of WWI. The M16 and M18 helmets remained in usage through-out the Weimar Reichswehr era and on into the early years of the Third Reich until the development of the smaller, lighter M35 style helmet in June 1935. In an effort to reduced construction time and labor costs minor modifications were introduced in March 1940 resulting in the M40 helmet. Further construction modifications were undertaken in August 1942 resulting in the M42 helmet. The Luftwaffe pattern national eagle was originally introduced for wear by Fliegerschaft personnel on August 18TH 1934, and adopted for wear by the Luftwaffe on March 1ST 1935 along with the national tri-color shield for wear on the helmet. The first pattern national eagle was utilized until a modified second pattern eagle was introduced in late 1936 or early 1937. Regulations of June 12TH 1940 discontinued the use of the national tri-color decal and further regulations of August 28TH 1943 abolished the national eagle decal and dictated that it was also to be removed from all helmets although the directives were not completely adhered to.
Shipping Weight: 5 lbs
Your Price $2,400.00 USD

WW1 Imperial German Camouflage Combat Helmet Stahlhelm M17
Item #: VF4651

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The stamped, sheet steel construction, helmet appears to be green leaves on top the helmet giving it a unique camouflage pattern. The helmet has all three flat headed, liner retaining rivets, both dome headed chinstrap retaining rivets and both of the extended ventilation side lugs all intact. The interior of the helmet has the post-May 1917 pattern, three pad leather liner with a steel retaining band intact. One of the fingers of one of the pads has been town away. The interior left side apron has the manufactures/size code stamp, "S.I..66", indicating manufacture by Eisenhüttenwerk Schlesien, Paruschowitz/ Oberschlesien. (Size 66). Nice worn and used example.
The first "modern" steel helmets were introduced by the French army in early 1915 and were shortly followed by the British army later that year. With plans on the drawing board, experimental helmets in the field, ("Gaede" helmet), and some captured French and British helmets the German army began tests for their own steel helmet at the Kummersdorf Proving Grounds in November, and in the field in December 1915. An acceptable pattern was developed and approved and production began at Eisen-und Hüttenwerke, AG Thale/Harz, in the spring of 1916. These first modern M16 helmets evolved into the M18 helmets by the end of WWI. The M16 and M18 helmets remained in usage through-out the Weimar Reichswehr era and on into the early years of the Third Reich until the development of the smaller, lighter M35 style helmet in June 1935.
Shipping Weight: 5 lbs
Your Price $900.00 USD

WWII Nazi German Persönlicher Stab Reichsführer SS RFSS Group Press and War Economy Sleeve Diamond
Item #: VF4648

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This ultra rare sleeve diamond is one from the series of sleeve diamonds introduced in 1942 for Fachführer and Fachunterführer, this particular one being for those serving on the personal staff of the RFSS Group Press and War Economy Persönlicher Stab Reichsführer SS Gruppe Presse und Kriegswirtschaft. The reverse of the insignia has a glue adhesive backing. The insignia is in overall excellent, unissued condition. Would be hard to upgrade. 
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $1,200.00 USD

WWII Nazi German Waffen SS 33rd Grenadier Division Charlemagne Collar Tab Set Kragenpatte
Item #: VF4647

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The 33rd Waffen Grenadier SS Division Charlemagne was made up with some French volunteers.  They were arguably the last German Unit to see action in a pitched battle during World War II, where they held central Berlin and the Führerbunker against the onslaught of Soviet Infantry.  Knowing that they would not survive should Germany be defeated, they were among the last to surrender in the brutal house-to-house and street-to-street fighting during the final days of the Battle in Berlin. This is a rare collar tab set features the right side tab is in the form of a circle with an "X” machine embroidered in silvery-gray cloth. The left side, or the rank tab features a plain black cloth badge. Both tabs have a buckram stiffener, typical Dachau construction.
In September 1944, a new unit, the Waffen-Grenadier-Brigade der SS "Charlemagne", was formed out of the remnants of the LVF and French Sturmbrigade, both of which were disbanded. Joining them were French collaborators fleeing the Allied advance in the west, as well as Frenchmen from the German Navy, the National Socialist Motor Corps (NSKK), the Organisation Todt and the detested Milice security police. SS-Brigadeführer Gustav Krukenberg took command, while Puaud (now a Waffen-SS Oberführer) was the nominal French commander. The two main infantry regiments were Waffen-Grenadier Regiment der SS 57 and 58. Members of the LVF were the nucleus of Regiment 57 and Sturmbrigade formed the core of Regiment 58. The LVF also manned the artillery battalion, the headquarters company and the engineer company.
In February 1945, the unit was officially upgraded to a division and renamed 33. Waffen-Grenadier-Division der SS "Charlemagne" (französische Nr.1). At this time it had a strength of 7,340 men. The Charlemagne Division was sent to fight the Red Army in Poland, but on 25 February it was attacked at Hammerstein (present day Czarne) in Pomerania, by troops of the Soviet 1st Belorussian Front. The Soviet forces split the French force into three pockets. One group commanded by Krukenberg survived. It was evacuated from the coast by the German Navy to Denmark and later sent to Neustrelitz for refitting; the second group with Oberführer Puaud was destroyed by Soviet artillery and the third group tried fighting its way back westward, but by 17 March all had been captured or killed
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $375.00 USD

WWII Nazi German Waffen SS 36th Grenadier Division Dirlewanger Collar Tab Set Kragenpatte
Item #: VF4646

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Beautiful set of Dachau made 36th Grenadier Division Dirlewanger collar tab set. Right hand side, unit designation, black wool construction collar tab features machine embroidered, crossed rifles positioned above a horizontal, stick grenade in silvery/gray rayon threads. The rank side is a matching all black collar tab. Both collar tabs are mounted on a tan buckram backing. The collar tabs is in overall excellent condition with minimal age toning.
In August 1929 the SS, Schutz Staffel, (Protection Squad), incorporated the wear of rank collar tabs on the left side of the collar of the service tunic. The SS collar tabs were originally adopted from the earlier rank collar tabs as utilized by the SA, Sturm Abteilung, (Storm/Assault Detachment). Reichsführer-SS Heinrich Himmler’s obsession with pagan runic symbolism manifested itself in runic emblems used by the SS, the most famous of which was the dual sig-runes used on the right hand side collar tabs as introduced in May 1933. Additional runic style collar tabs were introduced at various times through-out the war. The 36. Waffen-Grenadier-Division der SS "Dirlewanger" was originally formed in early 1944 from convicted criminals, primarily poachers, cashiered army personnel and other undesirables as the SS-Regiment "Dirlewanger". The unit evolved into the SS-Sturmbrigade "Dirlewanger" in December 1944 and in February 1945 the unit gained Divisional status and was designated, 36. Waffen-Grenadier-Division der SS "Dirlewanger". Although given Divisional status on paper the unit actually never surpassed Brigade strength. The commander of the 36. Waffen-Grenadier-Division der SS "Dirlewanger", a decorated WWI veteran, a Freikorps member and a Condor Legion veteran, SS-Oberführer d.R. Dr. Oskar Dirlewanger, was also a convicted child molester who had once been expelled from the SS on a morals charge. Dirlewanger was also highly decorated being a recipient of the German Cross in Gold and the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. Renown for his brutality, Dirlewanger played a key part in the German atrocities committed during the Warsaw uprising in August 1944. Considered extremely unreliable there were allegedly numerous requests for his dismissal by German army commanders that were ignored. Captured by the western allies Dirlewanger was allegedly killed while in captivity.
Shipping Weight: 0.6 lb
Your Price $425.00 USD